What is Columbia Design League?

We are a group of Columbia Museum of Art members who share a belief that design matters in every area of modern life. Our annual seasons abound with lectures and discussions led by architects, designers, artists, and other luminaries. The Design League collaborates with academic, civic, and professional organizations to bring appealing and insightful design programs and events to the region.

2018-2019 Season Calendar

September 6, 2018
Annual Meeting featuring Tactical Urbanism Expert Mike Lydon   
Columbia Museum of Art

October 9, 2018
Meet the Designer: The Hendrix Experience with Garvin Design Group
Hendrix, 1649 Main St.

November 7, 2018
The Public Restroom: Fear, Decency and Design
Harvey Molotch, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and Sociology — NYU
Columbia Museum of Art

February 9, 2019
Meet the Designer: BullStreet Community Party and Bus Tour with Hughes Development
BullStreet Neighborhood

March 2019
Mike Ford, The Hip-Hop Architect
In collaboration with AIA and ETV

June 2019
Dinner by Design
Columbia Museum of Art

Become a Member

$5 for Students

$15 for Avant Garde and Solo

$25 for other membership levels

You'll have a chance to add the Columbia Design League to your membership during checkout.

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Watch

The Public Restroom: Fear, Decency, and Design

The Columbia Design League presents Harvey Molotch, a professor of sociology and metropolitan studies at NYU and co-editor of the book Toilet: Public Restrooms and the Politics of Sharing, has a beef with American public bathrooms — the physical design often makes an important everyday experience exceedingly uncomfortable.

Play With Your City

The Play With Your City competition invites artists, architects, designers, and big thinkers to take a fresh look at familiar places.

In 2018 the competition focuses on two busy-- and boring-- intersections in the heart of a vibrant capital city. Why don’t pedestrians stick around? How can we bridge the boroughs? What will make us enjoy crossing the street or slowing down to experience it? What could push a shift toward people-first planning?